COMBINED OPTICAL AND MR MICROSCOPY SYSTEM FOR THIN TISSUE HISTOPATHOLOGY ANALYSIS


Year of Award:
2015
Award Type:
R43
Project Number:
CA193134
RFA Number:
PAR-13-327
Technology Track:
Molecular & Cellular Analysis Technologies
PI/Project Leader:
NEVO, EREZ
Other PI or Project Leader:
ACKERMAN, JEROME L
Institution:
ROBIN MEDICAL, INC.
The long term objective of the proposed project is to develop a new approach for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy (MRI/MRS) microscopy: contact scanning of thin tissue sections with a 2-dimensional array of micro-coils in precise analogy to conventional histopathology of thin sections with optical microscopy. Unlike routine MRI where the spatial encoding of the images is done with magnetic gradient fields, in the current proposal the encoding will be done by the spatial distribution of the 2D array of microcoils (the depth dimension will be eliminated by using 5 micron sections). The proposed technology has the potential to add new tool for pathology analysis of tumor biopsies. High resolution MRI/MRS of thin tissue sections may provide additional information on tumor characteristics, as learned from clinical MRS studies: better differentiation between malignant and benign lesions; additional prognostic information (e.g., tumor aggressiveness); and monitoring the effect of treatment in follow-up biopsies The specific aims of the proposed project are: 1. To develop a low-scale, 2D array of microcoils and the associated signal conditioning electronics; 2. To test the microcoil array in MRI scanner to demonstrate the feasibility of contact MRI/MRS of thin histopathology tissue section. To achieve the specific aims we plan to design and manufacture a high resolution printed circuit board (PCB) with a 2-dimensional array of microcoils that will provide the spatial encoding for microscopy MRI of the tissue section. Alignment of the PCB and the tissue section will be done with a customized XY-stage, guided by microscopy view of the 'sandwiched' tissue section and PCB. MRI scanning will be done in commercial high-field scanners. The MR signals induced in the microcoils will be acquired into the scanner for image construction. The regions for MRS spectra determination will be defined over the microscopic view of the registered tissue section and PCB. MRS spectra for each region will be calculated by summing signals from all coils enclosed in a specific region. The proposed technology has the potential to be developed into a commercial MRI/MRS microscope for pathology labs. If the technique is found to be clinically useful, the market will be substantil and will include pathology labs in any hospital that conducts interventional procedures.